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Water Legacy Greywater Recycling

by Jessica Hunt with Preservation Properties

 

google map to real pro systems

For most of us, setting up a grey water system— that is, setting up a system to recycle waste water that's only slightly contaminated to use for flushing a toilet or watering plants—is too complicated. Water Legacy aims to change that by bringing a mainstream grey-water recycling system into the home.

 

Water Legacy's residential graywater reclamation system conserves potable water by recycling spent water for safe usable purposes. Wastewater generated by homes is usually either black water, contaminated to levels that prohibit use, or graywater which can be treated and stored for non-potable reuse.


Water Legacy's system is a stand-alone system that collects used bathing greywater, filters and disinfects this water, and managgoogle map to real pro systemses the automatic supply to the toilet system. After it's installed, it requires no operator intervention.

Unlike the DIY solutions, Water Legacy uses a multi-barrier disinfection system to ensure that even the water in your toilet has been disinfected using hydrogen peroxide and UV. Unfortunately, this only supplies water to your toilet and is not designed to help you water your lawn or plants.

 

If you truly have equity and can't make the payments you want to sell as quickly as possible.  Contact 1 or 2 real estate agents who are familiar with your neighborhood and have a conversation with them about how much your home can sell for.  They should be able to tell you what your chances of success are, and that will be dependent upon how well homes are selling in your area and price range, condition of your home, specific location, and other criteria.  My point is that you want to hear from the agent the specific data that supports their estimate of your selling price.

Only after you have that probably price will you know how much equity you actually have.  Equity on paper isn't much help - you need to know how many dollars you can pull out.

If you can't sell you are going to be hard pressed to obtain the equity, if there is any.  Once you list the home for sale there is generally a 6 month waiting period AFTER you take the home back off the market before a lender will consider giving you cash out on a refinance loan.

If you have a lot of equity (say 40% or more) you may find a private investor to loan you the money but the cost would be prohibitive.  You need to focus on getting the home sold.

Save energy with landscaping

by Jessica Hunt with Preservation Properties

 

 

Landscaping Most homeowners carefully plan their landscaping for beauty, property value, comfort, and maybe water savings or neighborhood bragging rights. But smart landscaping also helps save on energy bills. On summer days, it feels cooler sitting under a tree or standing in the grass. Also, farmers have used lines of trees as windbreaks for centuries. There are easy ways for homeowners to use the same principles to save energy.

The U.S. Department of Energy estimates trees in the right spots around a home can save energy consumption by up to 25 percent, easily providing a return on most landscaping projects within eight years.

Here are some basic ways to save energy with landscaping. You can cut summer cooling costs, winter heating bills or possibly affect both at the same time. For all of the following landscaping work, work around existing plants. For the most part, larger trees and shrubs are more effective at saving energy. Let them grow. Likewise, think about long-term energy savings and plant slow-growing species that will live longer and withstand harsher conditions.

Saving on Cooling Bills

The biggest factor in summer energy savings is blocking the sun’s heat blasting through windows and raising inside temperatures, boosting air conditioning demand. You can save energy by strategically landscaping your yard.

Hire a landscape designer to help plant trees at the ideal angle to block direct summer sunlight but still allow natural light into the home. Consider large, wide deciduous trees near windows on the south side of the house, and near an air conditioning unit. The trees will block plenty of summer sun, but lose their leaves in the winter and allow passive solar heat. Recommended trees for saving energy include maples, birch, and many oaks.

The west and northwest sides of the house should also be blocked at low angles to block late afternoon sun. Plant fuller trees with lower branches in these areas to save energy. Until the trees properly mature, consider vines on or near the house. They can help keep the summer sun from baking walls and heating the house. Deciduous vines will get out of the sun’s way in winter, but windy areas might call for evergreen vines to block chilly winter blasts.

A landscaper might also be able to help design a channel of plants that will funnel cooling summer breezes into the house to help you save energy.

Finally, at the most basic level, any landscaping helps cool the air in the immediate vicinity and will reduce the amount of surface and ground heat seeping into the home. Soil covered with plants and shaded by trees will remain cooler than asphalt and other heat-absorbing surfaces.

Saving on Heating Bills

The key in winter is blocking cold wind while allowing the sun to provide passive solar energy. Harnessing passive solar energy helps you to save fossil fuel energy. The latter is simple. Just get the trees out of the way of south-facing windows (possibly by using deciduous trees, as mentioned above).

Rows of dense, low evergreen trees and shrubs can help block wind. Ideal shrubs will grow to between 6 and 10 feet, such as camellia, hollies, oleander, and Viburnum.

Heating and cooling bills can be significantly reduced with well-designed landscaping, including trees that cool the air and block summer sun, and shrubs that control winter wind.

Hybrid bulbs combine CFL and halogen bulb features

by Jessica Hunt with Preservation Properties

 

Another complaint against compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) will have to go by the wayside with the introduction of a new hybrid bulb from GE that is able to come to immediate full brightness as soon as it is switched on. As with cars, where hybrids combine the best properties of two transport technologies, hybrids are now an option for light bulbs, combining immediate brightness of halogen with the energy savings of a compact fluorescent.

GE LightbulbThe bulb itself is in a conventional incandescent-shape. Inside that is a now-familiar coil of compact fluorescent tubing. But, at the center of that is a small halogen capsule. When the light is turned on, both the halogen and the CFL come on, so that the bulb has full brightness immediately available. Once the CFL has reached its full brightness, the halogen portion automatically turns off, so that the life of the bulb is conserved.

The hybrid bulbs have an expected lifetime of 8,000 hours, about 8x as long as incandescent bulbs, and close to the expected life of regular CFLs. Additionally, these hybrid bulbs have a lower level of mercury than most currently available CFLs. The hybrid bulbs contain just 1 mg of mercury, while most current CFLs have 1.5 to 3.5 mg of mercury.

The hybrid bulbs are available for 60- and 75-watt replacement and should now be starting to appear in retail stores, with an expected price range of $5.99 to $9.99.

This article comes from Yahoo Green

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Contact Information

Preservation Properties
439 Newtonville Avenue
Newtonville MA 02460
Office: 617.527.3700
Fax: 617.527.2050